Watch the video!
Bernice Coppieters, Stephan Bourgond & Gaëtan Morlotti ©AB
©Alice Blangero
©Alice Blangero
Bernice Coppieters & Stephan Bourgond ©AB
Mimoza Koike ©AB
Anna Blackwell & Lucien Postlewaite ©AB
Anjara Ballesteros & Alexis Oliveira ©Michael Khoury
Watch the video! /photo©Alice Blangero
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Watch the video!
Bernice Coppieters, Stephan Bourgond & Gaëtan Morlotti ©AB
©Alice Blangero
©Alice Blangero
Bernice Coppieters & Stephan Bourgond ©AB
Mimoza Koike ©AB
Anna Blackwell & Lucien Postlewaite ©AB
Anjara Ballesteros & Alexis Oliveira ©Michael Khoury
Watch the video! /photo©Alice Blangero

Choré

J-Ch. Maillot

The backdrop to Choré is the emergence of musical theatre in the United States. Shown by the choreographer as less sparkling than in our imagination, here, this period is used as the pretext to question the evolution of dance. What does dance feed on? How far can it be liberated? At what point does it demand its share of beauty, humour and humanity to still feel alive? The world of musical theatre offers a valuable insight into the response and Jean-Christophe Maillot is able to take many of its elements to develop his own.

Evoking the lopsided walk of primitive man or even Saint Vitus' dance of fools, the first moments of Choré remind us that dance primarily obeys an urge. Jean-Christophe Maillot, pondering on the nature of this urge, asks himself whether through it we express our desire to rise into the air or to the contrary, to anchor ourselves more firmly to the ground? Musical theatre shows that anything is possible: the light and elegant style of Fred Astaire and the furious and grounded pounding of Gene Kelly.

Choré present the major, recurring antagonisms that trouble the world of dance, but which Jean-Christophe Maillot enjoys playing with. The role of the music, the relationship with the story, the connections with theatre, cinema and literature... Choré plays the diversity card and observes the inexhaustible language of dance. After the dance, there is yet more dance…

« A tribute to musical theatre and its legendary characters. (…) Some scenes are incredibly impressive (…) LIBÉRATION (Dec. 2013)

« Over the course of five scenes, Maillot embraces dance and political history since the Great Depression, homing in on key connections. » FINANCIAL TIMES (2013)

« Cinematographic Choreography. » TANZ MAGAZINE (2013)


Choreography: Jean-Christophe Maillot
Argument & texts: Jean Rouaud
Scenography and lighting: Dominique Drillot
Costumes: Philippe Guillotel
Music: Danny Elfman, Bertrand Maillot, Yan Maresz, John Cage, Daniel Ciampolini

Premier held on April 25th 2013, Grimaldi Forum Monaco